Nanci Clarence Recognized as Key Player in Reliant Deal: Defendants Admit No Guilt

The Recorder | March 7, 2007

“There's a group of very happy defense lawyers in San Francisco right now. On Tuesday, nearly three years after then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft announced on TV that an energy company had been charged with conspiring to jack up electricity prices during California's 2001 power crisis, the case ended with a set of deferred prosecution agreements.  The deals will dismiss charges against Reliant Energy and four of its traders, provided they stay out of trouble for the next two years. The company will also have to pay a $22.2 million fine.”

The Recorder | April 2, 2007

“Criminal defense lawyer Nanci Clarence had just pulled on her wetsuit for a day of surfing at Ocean Beach on March 4 when the lead prosecutor in the Reliant Energy Services Inc. market-manipulation case called to say the settlement was on the rocks…In 2004, Houston's Reliant Energy became the only corporation criminally charged with fraud and market manipulation in the aftermath of the California energy crisis of 2000. The indictment of the company and four of its traders became the biggest white-collar case in the San Francisco U.S. Attorney's Office.”

Los Angeles Times | March 29, 2007

“Financial investigators are deepening their probe into questionable business practices that have rocked the executive suite at California’s largest workers’ compensation insurance carrier, a top official told lawmakers Wednesday.”

Sacramento Bee | March 29, 2007

“Financial investigators are deepening their probe into questionable business practices that have rocked the executive suite at California’s largest workers’ compensation insurance carrier, a top official told lawmakers Wednesday.”

Contra Costa Times | March 29, 2007

“Our internal investigation is still in progress, and because this ongoing work is still occurring, and because we must protect the integrity of this investigation, our ability to share specifics of that investigation at this time are somewhat limited,” said Nanci Clarence, an attorney with Clarence & Dyer in San Francisco.

Return to News